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What is the Standard Deduction for Federal Taxes?

Standard Deductions

 

The standard deduction is a dollar amount, adjusted annually for inflation, that reduces taxable income. Generally, you cannot take the standard deduction if you claim itemized deductions. Hence, in preparing your taxes, compare the applicable standard deduction to your itemized deductions, and choose the one with the higher dollar figure. Also, note that itemized deductions may increase your chances of audit. Where your itemized deduction is only marginally larger than the standard deduction, choose the latter. Where your itemized deduction is significantly larger than the standard deduction, consult a tax professional to assess risk. The tables below detail the 2009 through 2017 standard deductions.1

 

 

2017

Filing Status

Standard Deduction

Unmarried Individuals

$6,350

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$6,350

Heads of Households

$9,350

Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$12,700

Dependents

Cannot exceed > of $1,050 or the sum of $350 and the individual’s earned income

 

 

2016

Filing Status

Standard Deduction

Unmarried Individuals

$6,300

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$6,300

Heads of Households

$9,300

Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$12,600

Dependents

Cannot exceed > of $1,050 or the sum of $350 and the individual’s earned income

 

 

2015

Filing Status

Standard Deduction

Unmarried Individuals

$6,300

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$6,300

Heads of Households

$9,250

Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$12,600

Dependents

Cannot exceed > of $1,050 or the sum of $350 and the individual’s earned income

 

 

2014

Filing Status

Standard Deduction

Unmarried Individuals

$6,200

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$6,200

Heads of Households

$9,100

Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$12,400

Dependents

Cannot exceed > of $1,000 or the sum of $350 and the individual’s earned income

 

 

2013

Filing Status

Standard Deduction

Unmarried Individuals

$6,100

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$6,100

Heads of Households

$8,950

Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$12,200

Dependents

Cannot exceed > of $1,000 or the sum of $350 and the individual’s earned income

 

 

2012

Filing Status

Standard Deduction

Unmarried Individuals

$5,950

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$5,950

Heads of Households

$8,700

Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$11,900

Dependents

Cannot exceed > of $950 or the sum of $300 and the individual’s earned income

 

 

2011

Filing Status

Standard Deduction

Unmarried Individuals

$5,800

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$5,800

Heads of Households

$8,500

Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$11,600

Dependents

Cannot exceed > of $950 or the sum of $300 and the individual’s earned income

 

 

2010

Filing Status

Standard Deduction

Unmarried Individuals

$5,700

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$5,700

Heads of Households

$8,400

Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$11,400

Dependents

$950-$5,700 (calculate using IRS worksheet)

 

 

2009

Filing Status

Standard Deduction

Unmarried Individuals

$5,700

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$5,700

Heads of Households

$8,350

Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$11,400

Dependents

$950-$5,700 (calculate using IRS worksheet)

 


 

1    Rev. Proc. 2008-66; Rev. Proc. 2009-50; Notice 2010-88; Rev. Proc. 2011-52; Rev. Proc. 2013-15; Rev. Proc. 2013-35; Rev. Proc. 2014-61; Rev. Proc. 2015–53; Rev. Proc. 2016-55;