Search Help


Enter one of more keywords to search. Use quotes for “exact phrase.” Note that '*' and '?' wildcards are supported.

When your search results appear, you can refine your search further: Sort for only results in which all search terms appear AND/OR sort by chronological order.


Share

How to Identify Your Personal Exemptions

Personal Exemption

 

According to the IRS, you are generally allowed one exemption for yourself and, if you are married, one exemption for your spouse. These are called personal exemptions. You can take one exemption for yourself unless you can be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. If another taxpayer is entitled to claim you as a dependent, you cannot take an exemption for yourself even if the other taxpayer does not actually claim you as a dependent. The table below details the 2009 through 2015 personal exemptions.1

 

Year

Personal Exemption

2015

$4,000

2014

$3,950

2013

$3,900

2012

$3,800

2011

$3,700

2010

$3,650

2009

$3,650

 

Phaseout of Personal Exemptions

 

As your gross income increases, your personal exemption decreases, i.e. phases out. According to the IRS, the personal exemption amount begins to phase out at, and reaches the maximum phaseout amount after, the following gross income amounts:

 

 

 

TAX YEAR 2015

 

Filing Status

 

Beginning of Phaseout

 

Maximum Phaseout

 

Married Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$309,900

$432,400

Heads of Households

$284,050

$406,550

Unmarried Individuals

$258,250

$380,750

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$154,950

$216,200

 

 

 

TAX YEAR 2014

 

Filing Status

 

Beginning of Phaseout

 

Maximum Phaseout

 

Married Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$305,050

$427,550

Heads of Households

$279,650

$402,150

Unmarried Individuals

$254,200

$376,700

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$152,525

$213,775

 

 

 

TAX YEAR 2013

 

Filing Status

 

Beginning of Phaseout

 

Maximum Phaseout

 

Married Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$300,000

$422,500

Heads of Households

$275,000

$397,500

Unmarried Individuals

$250,000

$372,500

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$150,000

$211,250

 

 

Note: Phaseouts were terminated for tax years beginning in 2010, but were reinstated in 2013. Unlike the 2009 exemption phaseouts, personal exemptions for years 2013 going forward can be reduced to zero. The 2009 exemption for taxpayers with adjusted gross income in excess of the maximum phaseout amount2 could only be reduced to $2,433.

 

 

 

TAX YEAR 2009

 

Filing Status

 

Beginning of Phaseout

 

Maximum Phaseout

 

Married Filing Joint Returns & Surviving Spouses

$250,200

$372,700

Heads of Households

$208,500

$331,000

Unmarried Individuals

$166,800

$289,300

Married Individuals Filing Separate Returns

$125,100

$186,350

 

 

Put the Tax Law to Work for You

 

To find new tax deductions that put money in your pocket, we suggest that you read the monthly articles published online at the Bradford Tax Institute. We provide cutting-edge tax information for the self-employed, the one owner business, and the husband and wife owned business.

 

If you're already a subscriber to the Tax Reduction Letter, you will be prompted to log in when you CLICK HERE.

If you are not yet a subscriber, CLICK HERE. You'll get a no-obligation 7-day FREE trial during which you can read all of our helpful tax saving tips from the last two months. This trial is absolutely free and there are no strings attached.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

1    Rev. Proc. 2008-66; Rev. Proc. 2009-50; Rev. Proc. 2011-12; Rev. Proc. 2011-52; Rev. Proc. 2013-35; Rev. Proc. 2013-47; Rev. Proc. 2014-61

2    Rev. Proc. 2008-66